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for us to strengthen our budget reserves and i believe we can cut taxes for everyone. but john, you decide we pay for things in indiana. when you were speaker for five or six years, indiana with $700 million in debt. we had a deficit of $820 million. facts are stubborn things. i would just like to know from my colleagues how we are going to make sure and preserve the fiscal integrity of the state of indiana. >> congressman, if you had spent the last 12 years in indiana, you would know better but it has to be balanced in indiana, according to our constitution. i have balanced and produced bipartisan balanced budget. i find it laughable that a united states congressman would lecture anyone about fiscal responsibility. five times, congressman, you voted in the results increase our deficit by $200 billion. >> bind key house and senate and governor races on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.com. >> great people and stories about american history. the first pilgrims in america came 50 years before the mayflower fail. they were french. they made one. they had the good sense to land in florid
tell, pitted the father of american civil engineering against a fellow namedded john rendell, an albany native, prom innocent family in new york, he was a skilled surveyor, and the man who had just spent a dozen years laying out and mapping the future street grid of manhattan. we're here on 57th street because 200 years ago, john put markers for thousands of rectangle blocks on then what was a rural and rugged landscape. john, he's the background. the path of the canal in the mohawk valley was to be entirely along the southern bank of the river using feeders from the mohawk to water the canal, to get water into the canal. now, between connecting albany, the mohawk makes a big northward arc in the eastern section of the mohawk river, with the falls spilling the mohawk into the hudson. rendell involved himself in the process. he'd been asked to become an engineer on the erie canal. he said no, probably because he was b continuing his work in manhattan with other projects he was doing, but in any case, at a certain point, inserts himself into this issue of the eastern end of the canal, and
at that point, economics was becoming important. up until that point, i assumed that lor--john maynard keynes had said everything there was to say about economics. but once we got stagnation and inflation at the same time, it was quite clear that someone had to revise economics. and although i knew i couldn't do it myself, i--at least i wanted to understand what was going on. so i took the year off, and i came to washington at the american enterprise institute, and mr. ford had just lost the election, so that laurence silberman and bob bork and nino scalia all came out of government. and before going on to their other careers as judges or as professors, they spent something like six months at the american enterprise institute. and we had no cafeteria then, we had no lunchroom, so we--the four of us brown-bagged it every day and just talked. then jude wanniski came down on a fellowship--he was writing his book then--and he started talking to us about supply-side economics, which was very interesting and about which we knew nothing, and those were a very stimulating peri--that was a very stimul
it to classmate, john, and his other son graduated in 03 misleading sailors today. he wrote his connection to the cause. this nonprofit book, this humble book that is good for the country. and then mr. brokaw. for nine at the e-mailed his assistant. i tried really hard and i pushed and pushed, but i don't quite. and the final weeks, he submitted his blurb that has changed this book. i have some bad news. there is more security around tom brokaw and admiral mullen. [laughter] sewer with the next greatest generation? as the lead author of this project, i would say we are prepared for greatness. we served in unique ways. with blood and lost classmates and ship me and subordinates and seniors on the battlefield or you see that in this book. but when you deploy for your country in that way, it changes the way you want to serve at home. so how did the world war ii generation to? they made the ultimate sacrifice. they came home and with the engine of progress for this nation for the latter part of a century. we, the 2.5 million veterans who are coming home in the years to come are prepared for go
counsel john rizzo, and former justice department inspector general lyn fine. posted by the center on national security, this is an hour 20 minutes. >> okay, marty has charged us with finding all the solutions, and luckily i'm only the moderator so i would have to charge the three of you with giving us some solutions. i think the way this panel is organized is to provide context for what you just heard. i hadn't quite realized it would work as a will that we have the right people to give the right context, both in terms of the law, in terms of the post-9/11 decade and where it's taken us, in terms of the self-regulating institutional function of government, to figure out its own problems, make its own recommendations and maybe suggest its own solutions. and in terms of what all this means from the point of view of working in the field, on the ground, inside a covert realm. so we're going to try to tie this all together today by looking at some of these issues. and i have to trust that we're going to get to some answers to our panel today is very distinguished. first, stephen vladec
more from the florida law school conference. next, we hear from former cia acting general counsel john rizzo and former justice department inspector general ballantyne. hosted by the center for national security, this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> okay. we have been charged with finding all the solutions. luckily, i'm only the moderator, saw only after charges review with giving a some solutions. the way this panel was recognized was to provide context for what you just heard and haven't quite realized over go so well. wheels of the right people to submit the context, both in terms of the law, in terms of the post september 11th decade where is taken as demand terms of the self regulating institution function of government to figure out its own problems, make its own recommendations and maybe suggest its own solutions and in terms of what all this means from the point of view of working in the field on the ground inside a covert rome. so that's -- for going to try to tie this all together by looking at some of these issues. and i have trust that we will get to some answers. our panel t
moving here. >> hi, my name is john. i've read all your books and this is very timely. [inaudible conversations] >> so i did to leave oklahoma? there's a lot of oil out there. you can't drill? >> i join the military, spent 20 years there. >> good for you. thank you for your service. thank you for coming. >> okay technically, no pictures. you can do them on signing. >> your dad? ibooks come out right before father's day. i hear that a lot. >> is actually my birthday. >> happy birth day. >> i meredith, by the way. >> i want to see where you were. >> i work at the center for public justice. >> what's that? [inaudible] >> good for you. that's a new group? [inaudible] >> for richard and cecilia? >> thank you. >> you don't have to. >> that's my aunt actually. >> nice to meet you. >> what's your name? >> hello, tim. >> i'm in sales that very rarely speechless. thank you. very nice to meet you. >> you should hang out when they're selling the book then. >> this is you? also encase i ever ever need dental work. >> deal that sent? [inaudible] >> thank you. thanks for coming. [inaudible conve
ex-president and that is how she made her name. still, she was better than john mccain. and you know in the hillary obama debate, the questions going question's going to obama were so thoughtful saturday night live did a sketch on it with hillary being asked these incredibly intricate, complicated policy questions and then the moderator asking obama if he would like another pillow. [laughter] and that was a fair summary and the stunning thing of last week's debate was and how poorly obama did. he is as good as he ever was. [applause] if john mccain had been on the stage with him, we would be the ones -- [inaudible] that is how magnificent mitt romney was in was the first time obama had to face a tough opponent, the first time. his whole life he has been, as he says, make any fast moves and he looked home and why people will love you. by his own account he was smoking pot at occidental university not particularly applying himself and manages to transfer to one of the premier universities and america, colombia and from there he rockets to harvard law school and president of "the harvar
than john mccain. and even in the obama hillary debate the questions going to obama were so soft ball saturday night live did a sketch on it with hillary being asked these intricate complicated policy questions and the moderator asking obama if he would like another fellow. that was a fair summary and the stunning thing was not how poorly obama did was the other one. [applause] >> if john mccain had been on the stage, we would be the ones with long faces. it was how magnificent mitt romney was and the first time obama had to face a tough opponent. his whole life he has been as long as you don't make fast moves white people will love you. by his account he was smoking pot and manage to transfer to one of the premier universities in america and from there rockets to harvard law school and president, only been president for two weeks and wednesday nobel priest -- peace prize. this was the first test he faced. he didn't do so well. you see it with stacy dash. it is as if as i wrote in my column they spend so much time fawning over entities like eugene robinson and barack obama that to res
the government, which has been a great operationally. i mean, john and i can talk about things and share with our colleagues in a way that we were not able to do, our counterparts were not able to do before september 11th and the patriots. the problem there, of course, is the more people who have access to this information, which is what we want, to give a real-life scenario, what you're talking about, a terrorism investigation in the united states, you're looking at it in the united states, you need to have integration sharing from the cia and their overseas collectors who are getting information about let's say the pakistan end of that network to the fbi headquarters who are getting that information and then sharing it with the fbi folks in the field, whoever that cell is and the local law enforcement folks who are actually out there in the streets. so all these people need to know the information it will be fully effective. the problem is, of course, that raises the possibility of that that affirmation will be compromised. and, you know, we saw that. he was able to get access to an amazing amo
-mails, confidential e-mails from karl rove. i said no we are not. it was by john wooden. i said john wouldn't run to web site. they're pulling your leg. i said now. it was sent to me these e-mails from karl rove's office from the republican national committee that were meant for brent doster, the republican chairman of the bush campaign who today is the chairman of the florida romney campaign. now, bbc does not allow me to read other peoples e-mails and by the way how did this happen? apparently it was sent by one of rove's right-hand man, and right-hand claws named tim griffith. not the sharpest knife in the drawer which explains why he's he is a congressman today. so tim sent out these e-mails but instead of sending these private combatants of e-mails to the republican, to the web domain, rnc.com, he sent them to rnc.org which is the web site owned by my friend. now i'm not allowed to look at people's e-mails if they are accidentally sent to us, and unless there is evidence of criminality. so i brought the e-mails and look, i brought the e-mails to a law professor of robert f. kennedy jr. and h
representative. this is a half-hour. postcode let me introduce you to john prible, vice president of the independent insurance agents and brokers of america. our topic is the national insurance program. mr. purple, this article was in "the wall street journal" yesterday ensures market bubble tab. what's the responsibility when it comes to recovering from sandy? >> guest: sure, that article and a hand like really captures exactly what is going on. so when a typical insurance event for a hurricane, there's going to be damage caused by wind, wind storm damage, fallen trees. you see in the news media there's going to be fires or natural gas lines. all of this damage will be covered are your typical homeowner's insurance policy that is covered by the private insurance, so you're going to contact if you have a claim camile contact your insurance company. they're going to cover it with your limits and deductibles and it's going to be private policy. any damage caused by flooding is covered only if you have a flood insurance policy to the national flood insurance program. that is the publ
abroad, he is weak at home. it's john major all over again. >> his position is completely incredible. he says he wants a cut in the e.u. budget, but he doesn't sanction a veto. we've made clear we will use the veto as i've used it before, so let me ask him, will you use the vie toe -- veto. >> order. order. i won't be using the veto, and i will ask the prime minister, about the tenth time i've asked him to respect parliamentary procedure in this matter. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the -- [inaudible] region faces many challenge, particularly with the announcement of job losses at ford last week. will my right honorable friend agree with me that the case for a city deal for south hampton and portsmouth is particularly compelling? >> i do think it is particularly compelling that we make sure south hampton has a city deal. i understand they are on the list. obviously, the news from ford was very disappointing. it was black spot in otherwise a very, very strong performance by the british automotive industry, and i know the business secretary will be working very closely with the city council t
to meet you. that is fine. that is why there of hughes psychos. >> your name is john? why did it in you leave oklahoma? there is a lot of oil out there. >> guide joined the military >> thank you for your service. >> technically, no pictures. you can do them while i am assigning. i hear that all lot. by before father's day. happy birthday. nice to meet you, meredith. >> there work at the center for public justice. and a organization promoting social injustice. >> good for you. it was formed in the '70s. >> i have not heard of that before. i will look into it. hello. thank you i am getting these four family. >> ice jams -- i am in sales. i will be honest. it is very nice to meet you. >> you should hang out where they are selling the books. >> and caisse i need dental work. >> do have an accent? thanks for coming. >> [inaudible] >> win is his birthday? >> halloween. thank you last night i saw the romney and paul ryan. >> night before even. [laughter] >> you did it with that? what happened to your wrist? >> q. did a better summary than i could give. >> i read demonic one year-ago. >> i get
and elsewhere, increasingly in the united arab emirates also. >> if i could just echo john's comments having run and embassy commercial operation in three locations in saudi, i came in as ambassador having spent my entire career in the private sector and had no idea of the resources and the capabilities that the embassy actually had on hand and could offer to american companies. it sort of iran's counter to the old joke that we are the government and we're here to help. in this case it actually is absolutely true. >> on that note we have run out of time. please help me thinking the panelists today. [applause] >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs, wiki's feature live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy events. every week and the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our website, and you can join the conversation on social media sites. >> democratic freshman congresswoman kathy hochul faces a challenge from republican chris collins. congresswoman coal-fueled clear the represents new yo
love. as the virginia plantation owner and american political theorist john taylor explained it, malthus was quote, in favor of resorting to law for professing. malthus teaches us in the english system one must devote one part of the community to death by famine or else to the necessity of living above half their lives without after tech shuns. according to taylor england was offering its people a stark choice between mass starvation on the one hand, or marital delay, population limitation and emotional private vision on the other. taylor even went so far as to use opposition to malthus as a means of justifying slavery. he taxed malthus with improposing a kind of moral slavery on his followers than was worse than any kind of legal slavery. is malthus, quote, proposes to introduced a system of celibacy taylor asked, who could fail to notice the difference in point of benevolence between indirect slavery to an absolute master, and direct slavery to an absolute master? in taylor's america even those subjected to quote, direct slavery to an absolute master retained the right to repr
on the telephone. he was sending john mccallum, the cia director of the center of intelligence come he would send john, who was very tight in the republican politics at this point, she would send him to advise. whenever there were -- he was reading the congressional leaders a was a bipartisan. he wasn't getting the democratic leaders on the phones giving them privileged information so he was very careful to be bipartisan in his political. >> host: i have to say when the tape recordings on the discussions emerged, they suggested that jfk and the advisers were not so much fearful or not so fearful that if they accept a public trade that this would appear weak to the american domestic political audience is that they would appear weak to nato. that they get the trade and ally were sacrificed and allied's interest that the net result was the same the deal was kept secret even in the end. >> guest: that's right if you are in a moment of crisis like this trying to negotiate things like how to get out of the crisis to train missiles and things you want yourself to be in the strongest possible position. a
or georgia o'keeffe for santa fe artist painters, john nichols, films, how many western have we seen that have the landscape in range? northern mexico in particular has a very powerful draw in terms of its enchanted landscapes, the official state that came -- nickname is land of enchantment which carries a with of new age mysticism with it. warm and fuzzy and tends to obscure complicated reality and that is what desert america is about. how we imagine the desert or the desert has been imagined for us by representations that created this imagery or created this vision of the desert for us, that is consumed and bought and sold and the stage upon real estate is sold and hotels and tourist packages and how complicated the act will human geography of the place is imagined. i am going to take you to northern new mexico briefly here. angela chosen northern new mexico. she is from central new mexico, albuquerque. both of our families have issues with addiction. that was another point of encounter between us but she chose northern new mexico, not to be right next door to her family, but close
ability to the challenges. thank you. >> i major john garber u.s. army and a doctorate student in chinese history here at georgetown. the military to military relations. you mention the air force and the navy in this region. my question in particular has to do with the view that the military to military relations are less than robust, the u.s. and china. what area to see and of what is what our energy descent on relation. this is her advantage of them in. >> i think we'll use both of these as an opportunity for all of our test to make their final comments. so unless he is quite general review. >> thank you. look, it's helpful the quadrennial diplomacy review. it's helpful in terms of how to recognize from the challenges we face not just in asia, but globally. the key to the state department unfortunate is going to be resources going forward. secretary clinton had an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's hard to convince others that they need to sustain the necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or collection of
and pacific. >> why would the assassin group, john wilkes booth team want to assassinate william henry seward? >> this has been the subject of some debate. some scholars think that booth realize in the event of the debt of both the president and vice president and secretary of state task with organizing an election. i don't think so. . wasn't a lawyer. un actor. a shakespearean actor who knew julius caesar backwards and forwards. he viewed himself as brutus, doing the right thing and lincoln as caesar the tyrant. steward is a little like mark antony, the coat tyrant. he wanted to be sure that the coach tyrant was eliminated as well as the tyrant. >> more about abraham lincoln's team of rivals, william seward with walter stock, sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. >> since the university president rodney erickson speaks about the future of his university and answers questions about the ongoing child sex abuse investigation and formal charges against former university president graham spaniard. this is about an hour. >> it is a picture-perfect college town nestled amid the majestic hills of ce
president. that's how she made her name, but, still, better than john mccain. [laughter] and even, you know in the hillary-obama debate, the questions to obama were softball that saturday night live did a sketch on it with hillary clinton asked complicated policy questions and the moderator asking obama if he wanted another pillow. [laughter] that was a fair summary, and the really stunning thing of last week's debate was not how poorly obama did. he was as good as he ever was. [applause] if john mccain was on the stage with him, we'd be the ones with long faces this week. no, it was how magnificent romney was and first time obama faced a tough opponent. i mean, his whole life he's been, as he says, as long as you don't make fast moves, look calm, white people love you. by his own account, smoking pot at the university, not particularly applying himself, and manages to transfer to the premier universities in america, columbia, and from there, he rockets to harvard law school, and he's instantly president of the harvard law review, he was president for two weeks, and he wins the nobel peace
are getting your take on this and we will go to john next in mexico. a democratic caller. go ahead, john. >> caller: hello. yeah. good morning, c-span. it's always a great honor to be on c-span. you quoted the ipcc report. i studied this in geology last year and wrote a report. those are the top scientists in the world. they use words like a mac with a plea, climate change is rarely used, words like absolutely the climate change has been used. 95-degree present uncertainty the planet has been changed. i drive a ford in the festival great mustangs and i'm driving a truck now, pickup truck, and i like driving, i like the freedom of driving and i want to be a hypocrite here because climate change is real and you can ignore it. it's not going to go away. you think and act of god it's not planned to change it. the top scientists in the world agree on that report the ocean level was rising, climate change is real. yes, ma'am. >> host: you were talking about you like driving. here's the "the washington times" editorial this is how we conclude global warming in spite of automobile regulations wo
. a pair of ohio politicians will rally for mitt romney, rob portman and john kasich. you can see the event live at 5:30 eastern also on c-span. and a little bit later it's the nominee himself, mitt romney will speak in jacksonville, florida, joined by former golf jeb bush at the event. also on c-span live at 8 eastern. >> you know, indiana's made incredible progress in the last eight years. we've honestly balanced budgets during all those years, we've become the fiscal envy of the country, and now we have the largest budget surplus that we've ever had in our history. it's going to make it possible for us to strengthen our budget reserves, and i believe we can cut taxes for every hoosier. but, john, you just said that we pay for things in indiana, okay? but when you were speaker of the house, for five of the six years that you were running the statehouse, indiana ran deficits. when mitch daniels came into power just a couple years later on budgets you helped to write, indiana was $700 million in debt and had a deficit of $820 million. you know, john, facts are stubborn things, and i'd just
. that's followed by montana senator john tester against republican congressman denny rehberg, and later, arizona congressman flake facing rich carmona. watch the election results tuesday nights and key contests in the house, senate, and governors' races on c-span. tonight here on c-span2, penn state president erikson speaking at the national press club followed by a u.s. house debate from new york, and, later, a debate on issues that matter to young voters in this year's presidential election. >>> next, penn state university president speaks about the future of his university, and he'll also answer questions about the on going child sex abuse investigation and the former charges against former university president. this is about an hour. >> it's a picture-perfect college town nestled amid the central hills of central pennsylvania. an enormously popular university boasts the largest alumni association in the country, but things were anything but happy when our guest assumed the presidency of penn state last november. the school reeling from a child sex abuse scandal involving long time p
at this the trust him to really get out of control. anyway, thank you so much. [applause] >> thank you, john walsh salaam of, editor of large from msnbc analyst and author of the new book what's the matter with white people or i should say what's the matter with white people why we long for the golden age that never was. now it's time for questions from you. we have a few to get started with and i will probably come up with some of my own. let's ask one of these from the audience. one person would like to know can we have a democracy without a middle class? >> it's very hard. i think that's why we decided to create one after the twin traumas of the terrible depression and the worst war that we had ever seen. i think that we -- it's very hard to have a country where economic power is so concentrated in the hands of very few and they then raided the game to make sure that it continues both economic and political power is to be concentrated there. my book is critical of democrats in some ways. if you want to know why mitt romney pays a scandalously disgustingly low tax rate need to talk to some democ
and became a combat officer. his younger brother, john crandall, became a doctor. when the civil war began, he enlisted in the 16 vermont regiment and that is one of the things that is very important. he is a man of adventure and he goes west, he writes wonderful letters home of the planes in and the bison, but he gets out well before. but his brother come in the civil war, richard, he is in the major fighting in the east. he survives and comes home 1864. they talk about the war it was a lifetime of experience. he survived the great battle of wilderness. on the seventh day of june, 1864, a sharpshooter from long-distance kills him dead. his body is brought back here. this is a civil war site. i was able to identify this as being their home, although it was a difficult search. the family did not own a home. they were renters and tenant farmers and it was very difficult to find land records and census records let me to it. they came from these remote places in vermont. the most famous inaugural comic gettysburg, for instance, going from these little towns down these little roads. vermont sol
path. >> i enjoyed your speech. after the attack the john mccain of writing the book in regards to that navy s.e.a.l. about the attack. of threats and he and his family you have been a retired navy s.e.a.l. as this happens to you? >> sir, it has not. what happened in that case was that there were a very specific mission and concerns about very specific classified and sensitive information that was actually contained in that book. of course he was part of that mission and he was 65 there were concerns about threats against him. what we have done in "the warrior's heart" and also in this is all the of permission we have shared is publicly available information about what happens in that navy s.e.a.l. training, but we put it together in such a way that people can think that just about what navy s.e.a.l. do and what they live through but how they reflect on that and make it part of their own lives as they think about their own challenges. and so because the books are different in now way we have not had any -- i have not had any problems. in fact, i've had a tremendous amount of sup
will hear this knock. on the door, and you go and open it. there is john latham, stephen king, and me, and we are wearing robes. [laughter] [applause] [cheers] and we say now, you will learn. [laughter] honestly, it is easier than not. you just write. and you know what? stuff that you right at the beginning doesn't have to be very good. you just keep writing. that is the trick. four years ago i taught a science fiction five-week long, six-week long science-fiction boot camp. and i did week four, which is when everyone cries and has a nervous breakdown spirit and they did indeed do that. which was great. [laughter] at one point, one of my guys said how can you tell? can you tell which of us is going to make it. and i said no. he said, but some of us are brilliant, and can you tell? and i said no. the ones that are going to make it would be the ones that write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant have written brilliant stories and never write again, they are the ones who get in there and write everyday and finish their stories. then they write the next ones. and they
director, director of central intelligence, john mccohen, tight in republican party politics at this point, sent him to brief eisenhower. whenever there were -- he was briefing congressional leaders, it was a bipartisan affair, not getting democratic leaders on the phone giving them privileged information. he was carriful to be bipartisan in the political awareness. >> host: the recordings suggested that jfk and the advisers were not so much fearful or at least not so unfearful that if they accepted a public trade if that would appear weak to american domestic political audiences, but appear weak to nato they betrayed aen ally or sacrificed an ally's interest, and, you know, but the net result was the same that the deal was kept secret in the end. >> guest: exactly, yeah, that's right. if you're in a moment of crisis like this trying to negotiate things like how to get out of the crisis, whether to trade missiles or anything like that, you, naturally, want to be in the strongest possible position, and you don't do that by volunteering information or volunteering things that are potentially
believe we can cut taxes. john, you just said we pay for things in indiana. okay, but when you were speaker speaker of the house, for five of the six years, indiana ran deficits. when mitch daniels caiman is a couple of years later on budgets that you helped to write, indiana was a 700 million-dollar state in debt, and had a deficit of $820 million. facts are stubborn things. i would just like to know for my colleagues how we are going to make sure we can preserve the fiscal integrity of the state of indiana. >> congressman, if you would've spent the last 12 years in indiana rather than in congress come up you would know that our balanced budget has to be done according to the constitution. i have balanced and produced bipartisan budgets. oddly, you talk about fort wayne's own day long in our lieutenant governor. i find it almost laughable that a united states congressman would lecture anyone about fiscal responsibility. you heard it not once, not twice, but five times, congressman. you voted and the results increased the deficit by $200 billion. >> find key house and senate in gove
to strengthen our reserves and cut taxes for every hoosier. but, john, you just said we pay for things in indiana, okay in but when you were speaker of the house, for five of the six years that you were running the statehouse, indiana ran deficits. when mitch daniels came into power just a couple years later, indiana was $700 million in debt and had a deficit of $820 million. you know, john, facts are stubborn things, and i'd just like to know from my colleagues on stage how are with we going to make sure and preserve the fiscal integrity of the state of indiana? >> congressman if you'd spend the last 12 years in indiana rather than congress, you'd know our budget has to be balanced according to our constitution. i've balanced and produced bipartisan balanced budgets and, oddly, these you talk about, they were supported by fort wayne's own david long and our lieutenant governor, becky skillman. i find it almost laughable that a united states congressman would lecture anybody about fiscal responsibility. you voted not once, not twice, but five times, congressman, you voted -- and the re
] >> thank you for your kind introduction, president john degoiia. the korea economic institute is very honored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partners than the edmonds school of foreign services and president john degoiia and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really do think that the 21st century will be seen as an asia-pacific century, much of the economic dynamism and growth will emerge from this region. and, of course, many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and, of course, the security problems on the korean peninsula, to name a few. u.s. leadership in continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the economic institute, i think the tremendous past contribution of these notable assistant secretaries of state to the
missed the copy of this on the way in, we recommend it to your reading and i would say to john and steve thanks for inviting me to participate here in this event and i will get into that in a minute on why i think it's important. i would also like to add my voice to the memory trip who contributed as he things to so many things in life to this effort just before he passed away, and quite a remarkable man as john indicated with an amazing list of accomplishments and a relatively short life. so, trip, hopefully you are up their smiling on these efforts and somehow using your powers and spirits to motivate us to do more and do it better. i'd like to say a few things about the effort. the idea to have been to some of our most experienced leaders in both civilian and diplomatic and military sides come to get their views and experiences before they tend to disappear into the recesses of their memory so that we can collect the body of firsthand knowledge through the experience of many people who have done a lot of work in recent years in connecting the dots between security, something that i've
words in john small, but john i think you said if i remember correctly, that the budget was, quote on quote, too timid. did you say that? i did. let's be clear what the right and budget does is make devastating cuts and virtually every program in the medicare as we know it right now major cuts in pell grants, major cuts in nutrition programs and i have no doubt. john as i understand it wanted to go even further to see the deficit reduction to do it not on the backs of the elderly, the sec and the poor and that is by asking the wealthiest people and the largest corporations to start paying their fair share of taxes. i was talking about it gets us to solve that problem over a period of ten years. i thought ten years was too long basically. that was not an endorsement of every single item in the budget but the direction is going in, and whether or not i would support cutting if i supported that the budget i don't know. i have to look at the budget and see what cuts are necessary, but the most important point to remember is this. half of the budget is reform of the tax code to get the
and commented on stewart -- john stuart's book. no one has come after me today. the biggest incendiary, you should have read the draft i read. i am one of the few lawyers who practices in front of the supreme court who did not file a brief in the fisher case. let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative-action. the question in this case is the university of texas violated the equal protection clause in connection with undergraduate admission programs and abigail fisher when she was injured by what the university of texas did? i want to start by explaining a little more than stuart did about the admission program and what it is supposed to do and what it is not supposed to do and what it does or doesn't do so we have the top 10%. this guarantees anyone who graduates in the top 10% of their high school class in texas, admission to the university of texas. it does not get you into your preferred academic program. if you want to be in business, you guarantee something but not necessarily business. and only applies to gra
and spirit of jesus. go get them! sign her up. [applause] in 1962 pope john xxiii said to george mcgovern, director of food for peace, you have seen this quote many times, the pope said when you meet your maker have you fed the hungry, give a drink to the thirsty and cared for the lonely you, george, could answer yes. today we celebrate george stanley mcgovern is resurrected in christ and has met his maker. we celebrate that he knew what to do and he did it. with every fiber of his being and every breath he took and every word he spoke, today we celebrate george mcgovern said yes, yes, lord, i fed the hungry and clothe the naked and liberated the oppressed and beat the swords into plowshares and proclaimed the lord's blessing. we as a gathered community of faith and indeed a great formation join in saying well done george, well done good and faithful servant of the lord. we knew what to do and you did it. we release you now. we release you now to god's everlasting arms. rest in peace. may it be so. amen. [applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> let us pray. almig
. [applause] in 1962, pope john xxiii said to george mcgovern, then the director of food for peace, you have seen this quote many times. the pope said, when you meet your maker and he asks, have you fed the hungry, give a drink to the thirsty and cared for the lonely you george, can answer yes. .. >> and so we as a gathered community of faith and, indeed, the grateful nation, join in saying well done, george. well done good and faithful servant of the lord. you knew what to do. and you did it. we release you now. we release you now to god's ever lasting arms. rest in peace. may be so. amen. [applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> let us pray. almighty god, into your hands we commend your son george stanley mcgovern, insurance of resurrection through jesus christ our lord to eternal.com you've shared with us the life of george mcgovern. before he was ours he was yours. for all that george has given us to make us what we are for that of him which lives and grows in each of us, and for his lif
by the federal government. mr. haldeman spoke about the housing market and financial regulations at the john f. kennedy school of government. this is just under an hour. >> i'm a member of the faculty here at the kennedy school at a romani school of business and government. it's a pleasure to welcome all of you to this year's lecture, which is funded by nasd, which is now in the, the private broker of the u.s. industry. the focus is on financial regulation and each year we have had a leading public official responsible in some ways for u.s. regulation. this year, our speaker is a tiny bit of a stretch, but not really much at all. ed haldeman was ceo of freddie mac from a 2009 to just a few months ago. while in that role, ed was not really a formal regulator. he was responsible for running a very large public financial institution. freddie mac and its sibling, fannie mae are what are called government-sponsored entities, gics. for years described as private companies at the public mission of supporting housing or more simply, as mixed public-private enterprises. but in september 2008, both inst
these minorities feel not only that they would survive, but that they would thrive. >> john, if i can ask for questions requested, and anybody can try to answer them. how would a variety of possible future serial look at separatists and other extremist anti-statist quote groups attempted to and succeeded in dividing syria into multiple political entities, if not new countries? how, given these kinds of possible scenarios might one rank these yet to be achieved or yet to be attempted alternative, alternate maps of syria or of probability? number three, how, if at all, does israel stand to gain from the conflict in syria? and lastly, how, in light of persistent attacks on iraqi american and other security forces, in iraq, contract security forces on the american side, can one envision iraq regaining the degree of national sovereignty political independence and territorial integrity that it manifested prior to the american-led invasion and occupation? john, do you want to choreograph the response? >> why don't we just, we will start with moan and work our way down. >> i'll just take a stab a
, which won the john burroughs medal potential history rating. david holds honorary degrees from colorado college in montana state university where he served as though professor of western americans studies. he's also won the national magazine award three times for articles in a wide variety of magazines including "esquire," the atlantic and "rolling stone." the third of these awards, magazine awards was for the "national geographic" story called what starr went wrong. national agree -- "national geographic" kids in the -- which requires them to recommend egc three articles a year? three articles a year for "national geographic." he describes his sealed biology, evolutionary biology, theoretical ecology and conservation. after this evening, i hope you will have as much appreciation for his physical strength and stamina as you have for his writing talents. in his field research ejects indiana jones through the resource that many of us would never want to step foot in. tonight you're going to learn a new word, at least i learned a new word. who knows this are infectious diseases that origin
. they started on january 1, 1962, bit president john f. kennedy. the reason why he started the seals, he wanted to have a force -- seal stand for sea, air and land commando. and president kennedy wanted to have a force of people, dedicated and highly trained force, he could put into difficult situations who could not only respond tactically and using physical courage but could also respond and use their minds and be thoughtful about working in some very difficult, dangerous situations, and his theory, the international relations theory was called the flexible response, and the deal was the united states needed to respond in a flexible manner, not just using nuclear weapons which was the theory at the time. we needed to be able to respond in a flexible manner to any threat and that led to the development of the seal team. >> care to comment about the latest book about bin laden raid? >> sure. the question was, would i care today to comment on the latest book about the bin laden raid? i don't think that was a good -- is a good book to write. one is i've got tremendous respect for admiral mccravee
monroe. and, of course, that included john adams, thomas jefferson and james madison as well as washington and monroe. for slavery, the founding fathers bequeathed a more complicated legacy than lincoln reported, and evidently wanted to believe. in the crisis, lincoln never spoke publicly to the south, but he did write some private letters to a few southerners who had written to him. in these letters lincoln would talk about slavery and talk about right and wrong, telling the southerners that they thought of it as right, and he thought of it as wrong. this is not new language for lincoln. as early as 1850, he told a former law partner that the slavery question can't be compromised. that was a logical statement from a man who -- shackled slaves as a continual torment to me. lincoln compared slavery and freedom to to wild beasts in sight of each other, but chains held apart. someday he predicted these deadly antagonists will break their bonds and then the question will be settled. a key reason for his opposition to stephen a. douglas, the great democrat from illinois, lay in wh
promoting dill saying what a bad guy -- says i'm a supporter of george w. bush. i campaigned for john kerry in twawr, but it comes to me that safe nation, pac, 57 street, georgia. who is this? it's a couple republican operatives in atlanta who are sending a misleading flier to democrats in maine trying to convince them to vote for cynthia dill. the whole thing is ridiculous. i think the rule ought to be only residents of the place where you are running can contribute. if you run for the u.s. senate in maine, only maine people can contribute. i would live with that system in a minute. >> the founder principle was representation. that's leading to the birth ofÑr our country. it was not about corporations. it was not about rove. it was about representation. one of the most precious freedoms that was free speech. since the unit, terrible decision. super pacs bad, election reform. we need that. people talk about big government being bad. my experience in terms of the campaign is it's the political and industrial complex that's just insidious both here in maine and nationalliment i think we have
, 1962, by president john f. kennedy. the reason he started the seals was he wanted to have a force, sea, air and land, and no, what president kennedy wanted to do was have a force of people, a highly trained course to put in difficult -- could not only respond tactically but be thoughtful about working in some difficult situations. the international relations theory was the flexible response. we needed to respond in a flexible manner to any threat out there and that led to the development of the seal team. >> any comment about that? >> the common on the latest book about the bin laden raid, i don't think that with a good book to write. i will tell you why. one was tremendous respect admiral mcrae then, a four star navy seal admiral in charge of special operations. he took over from at role eric olson, another 4-star navy seal and charges that watered -- special operations command and there were classified and sensitive information in the book and important that we keep that classified and sensitive information secret so that we could protect other navy seals conducting operations in the
in the six vermont regiment and became a combat officer. his younger brother, john crandall, became a doctor and when the civil war began, he enlisted in the 16th of vermont regiment and that is one of the regiment that took discharge during gettysburg. after the battle, he took care of the vermont wounded on the battlefield. after the war, he goes west and joins george armstrong and the seventh calvary. he writes wonderful letters home about his adventures before little bit more. but his brother in the civil war, he is in the major fighting zones in the east. he survives and comes home in 1864. a friend of his from dartmouth goes to the top of one of the high mountains. they talk about the war and randall remarks that the battle of fredericksburg has a lifetime's worth of experience. he goes back toward, the vermont brigade is in the overland campaign. he survives the great battle at spotsylvania, and then it is cool and he survives the big attack, but on the seventh day of june, 1854, a sharpshooter from the long-distance kills him dead. his body is brought back here to burlington. we are
want to thank john buckman and the gw law community for giving me the opportunity to speak and be on this panel of members with the point of view. hopefully it will be an educational few minutes for you. to figure out whether the dodd-frank act went too far worse just about right, you have to start with an understanding of where the dodd-frank act is. while much is still speculation, there's enough substance that are deep inside in the act but it's useful to begin a discussion about the efficacy of the basic tenant of the dodd-frank act. so beginning in the summer of 2008, through the enactment of the dodd-frank act, during and following the worst financial crisis since the 1930s, the federal reserve and the other financial regulators asked congress for three types of tools to address them to the extent possible, send out incidents that would threaten or harm financial stability. first, we ask for authority to take stability of the financial system into account in the supervision of financial firm and beyond the tradition of safety and soundness of individual firms. second,
martin heinrich and republican candidate had their wilson and they are to replace john bingaman -- jeff bingaman who is retiring. both candidates have agreed to the debate rules to each candidate will have one minute to make an opening statement later they will have one minute for a closing statement. the candidates will be given one minute to answer each question and then 45 seconds each for the rebuttal. later the candidates will be allowed to ask the other candidate a question which is often very enjoyable. the answers will be limited to one minute and each will have 45 seconds for a rebuttal. martin heinrich won the coin toss and he's been selected to go second with his opening statement. so, heather wilson, please go ahead with your opening statement. wilson: thank you, tom, for hosting this this evening. we have two kids at home, one about to go to college and another one that is the queen of her universe in high school, and i worry about them. i whether there will be jobs for them when they finish school and there is nothing more important in america today and moving forward towa
and follow up. so regardless of whether the congressman's republican party and john boehner remain in control or democrats take control of the house, i'm committed to ensuring we have the best people in our office responding to the needs of our constituents. in terms of working with the other side of the aisle, the last two years we have seen, getting nothing done in congress, that we will learn from that when we begin a new session in january. from my part, having spent most of my career in nonpartisan public service, not seeing republican or democrat, i believe i have the experience and the temperment to ensure i can reach across the aisle. is a said at the outset, we're we have a sharp campaign because i care about the values of the region. you haven't heard me say anything negative about the congressman personally. it's very important to say you have differences but not personalize them. and that's the attitude i'll bring to service in congress. >> congressman gibson? >> julian is right on constituent services, regardless what party you're in. we serve, republicans, democrats, independent
. most recently by john conyers. again, h.r. 676 is a medicare for all legislation, and we should not medicare the way it is and use medicare for all. and i think the medicare for all would transfer $560 billion that right now going to the bureaucracy and the monopoly process of drug companies take care. because what we have right now is not a health care system. we have a sick care system that is focused on insurance company profits that only go up when they deny us care. the best way to stabilize health care costs if you take the and put them in a medicare for all system. i just wanted to go toward reform for just one second. i would suggest ann marie buerkle discuss tort reform with senator defrancisco was said that tort reform is not a problem and that medical malpractice insurance only contributes very slightly to health care costs. with a medicare for all system we wouldn't have to worry about tort reform. we would not have a lawsuit that would cover care. >> moderator: thank you. with 30 seconds for you, dan maffei to rebut. maffei: i think it's important and we talks about
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